Adult Field Services

Adult Field Services

Adult Field Services is a unit within the Division of Community-Based Programs and Field Services, and is led by Director Tyson Jenkins. Adult Field Services includes: presentence investigations, assessments, and case management/supervision of probationers, post-release supervision, and problem-solving court participants.  Additionally, this focus area includes the following services: Reporting Centers, Service Centers, Transitional Housing Assistance, Electronic Monitoring, Victim Services and other community based services. 

What does Probation’s Adult Field Services Provide?
In Nebraska, Probation is a part of the Supreme Court, under the Judicial Branch of Government.  Probation has two primary functions in its service to the Court, presentence investigations and the case management/supervision of probationers, post-release supervision, and problem-solving court participants.  These functions are defined and dictated in Nebraska Statute (Neb. Rev. Stat. 29-2257; Neb. Rev. Stat. 29-2261; Neb. Rev. Stat. 29-2262.04; Neb. Rev. Stat. 29-2263).  Adult Field Services supports each of the 14 probation districts within the state. (Click here to find your District). 

A presentence investigation is ordered by a Court to assist a Judge in making a decision regarding sentencing for adult offenders.  Presentence investigations are completed by highly skilled probation officers, and the document provides the court with background information such as criminal, employment/education, and substance use/mental health history.  These reports also assess an individual’s support system, antisocial attitudes and pro-criminal thinking.  An assessment of risk to re-offend; restitution/victim claims; substance use issues and anything else relevant to the case is also included in these reports.

Probation’s other function is to effectively manage and supervise probationers, post-release and problem-solving court supervision clients within their communities.  When the Court places an individual on probation as an alternative to jail or prison or on post-release supervision, highly skilled probation officers incorporate intervention and case management strategies.  These strategies are intended to help clients become more successful within their communities and overcome contributing liabilities, such as substance use, mental health, and a lack of education/employment skills.  Other case management approaches include cognitive behavioral restructuring, targeted treatment interventions, and family and community engagement.  Probation officers balance their client’s best interest while maintaining public safety.  Nebraska Probation is committed to providing Evidence-Based, best practice services designed to change behavior, improve families, and ultimately enhance community safety.